June 2012

A video tells how the works are proceeding at the Monastery of St. Francis, near the Cenacle


Works are continuing at the Monastery of St. Francis on Mount Zion, better known as the Cenacolino (“little Cenacle”)
. It is just a few meters from the place commemorating the Last Supper and the Pentecost, and since the first half of the twentieth century has been the residence of a small community of friars from the Custody.

As Father Enrique Bermejo ofm – guardian of the monastery – explains in a video produced by the Franciscan Media Center:

Today works continue here, not only for maintenance but above all for serving the many pilgrims who come here to celebrate the Eucharist, just a few steps away from where it was established. To help cope with this large inflow, it was decided to enlarge one of the two chapels adjacent to the monastery, which will be significantly extended and will offer disabled access through the gardens.

The works in the interior of this Holy Place, which is of fundamental importance for the countless pilgrims who come to Jerusalem to retrace the events of the earthly life of Christ, is part of a broader project entitled “Jerusalem, Stones of Memory”. Through this project the Custody of the Holy Land, with the support of ATS pro Terra Sancta, is providing for the maintenance and restoration of sanctuaries and monasteries, as well as of many dwellings of Christians living in the Holy City. An appeal from Father Enrique in support of this renovation, addressed to the many faithful who are here, as well as those who will be coming at some point in the future:

When renovations take place we want the faithful to also be involved, because these are in fact being carried out for them. Despite the difficult economic situation in which we find ourselves, it is our hope they will feel themselves to be part of this new reality they will discover when they come here to celebrate during their pilgrimages.

To learn more about the project, please visit the site Jerusalem, Stones of Memory.

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